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Vanessa Leggard

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Hamptons Wellness: The Benefits of Ginger: Ginger is widely used throughout the world for treating loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting after surgery, nausea resulting from cancer treatment, flatulence,stomach upsetcolicmorning sickness and motion sickness.

Some people find ginger helps them with the symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, cough, menstrual cramps, arthritis and muscle pain.

In some parts of the world, ginger juice is applied to the skin to treat burns

GINGER: Nausea, upset stomach…When I was pregnant with both of my daughters I have really bad morning sickness and I was nauseous all the time, literally until they were born. This is why they are 6 1/2 years apart and why I only have 2.

Some say drink Ginerale & Saltine Crackers but the sugar from the gingerale made me feel sicker…Ginger Tea is the Best..Treat yourself to a cup of piping hot ginger tea, a healthy drink that’s great for digestion. Why go out and buy old tea bags when you can easily make your own homemade ginger tea at home using fresh ginger? Here’s how to make the tastiest ginger tea you’ve ever had!

Home-made Ginger Tea
Recipe Type: Tea
Cuisine: Liquid
Author: Vanessa Leggard
Prep time:
Cook time:
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Home-made ginger Tea…piping hot ginger tea, a healthy drink that’s great for digestion
Ingredients
  • 4-6 thin slices raw ginger
  • 1 1/2 – 2 cups water
  • juice from 1/2 lime, or to taste
  • 1-2 tbsp honey or agave nectar, or to taste
Instructions
  1. Peel the ginger and slice thinly to maximize the surface area. This will help you make a very flavorful ginger tea.
  2. Boil the ginger in water for at least 10 minutes. For a stronger and tangier tea, allow to boil for 20 minutes or more, and use more slices of ginger.
  3. Remove from heat and add lime juice and honey (or agave nectar) to taste.

9 Terrific Benefits of Ginger

  •  Eat fresh ginger just before lunch to stoke a dull appetite and fire up the digestive juices.
  • Ginger improves the absorption and assimilation of essential nutrients in the body.
  • Ginger clears the ‘microcirculatory channels’ of the body, including the pesky sinuses that tend to flare up from time to time.
  • Feeling airsick or nauseous? Chew on ginger, preferably tossed in a little honey.
  • Ginger helps reduce flatulence!
  • Ginger helps with Tummy moaning and groaning under cramps? 
  •  Ginger, with its anti-inflammatory properties—can bring relief. Float some ginger essential oil into your bath to help aching muscles and joints.
  •  Chewing ginger post-operation can help overcome nausea.
  • Stir up some ginger tea to get rid of throat and nose congestion. And when there’s a nip in the air, the warming benefits of this tasty tea are even greater

Hamptons Wellness: The Benefits of Ginger:

(Hamptons) How about making your own General Tsao’s Chicken …I thought I would share this recipe with all of you because it is so delicious. Perfect with any type of Rice, you really will never want to order General Tsao’s chicken from a Chinese Restaurant again. I do not use peanut oil in my recipe or red chillies, I substitute the Jalapeño peppers instead, they are not as hot as the red chili peppers.

General Tsao’s Chicken II
Recipe Type: Entree
Cuisine: Asian
Author: chefdaddy
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Cook time:
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Serves: 6
A genuinely mouthwatering dish with an Asian kick that will knock your chopsticks off! Don’t be fooled by other General Tsao impostors: this is simply the best Chinese chicken you will ever have. With a flair of peanut oil, a streak of sesame, a dash of orange, and a sweet spot for hot, this is sure to be a favorite. Just don’t forget to deep-fry twice! Serve with steamed broccoli and white rice.
Ingredients
  • 4 cups vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon white sugar
  • 1 pinch white pepper
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3 tablespoons chopped green onion
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 6 dried whole red chilies
  • 1 strip orange zest
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 3 tablespoons chicken broth
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup water
Instructions
  1. Directions
  2. Heat 4 cups vegetable oil in a deep-fryer or large saucepan to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).
  3. Beat the egg in a mixing bowl. Add the chicken cubes; sprinkle with salt, 1 teaspoon sugar, and white pepper; mix well. Mix in 1 cup of cornstarch a little bit at a time until the chicken cubes are well coated.
  4. In batches, carefully drop the chicken cubes into the hot oil one by one, cooking until they turns golden brown and begin to float, about 3 minutes. Remove the chicken and allow to cool as you fry the next batch. Once all of the chicken has been fried, refry the chicken, starting with the batch that was cooked first. Cook until the chicken turns deep golden brown, about 2 minutes more. Drain on a paper towel-lined plate.
  5. Heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Stir in the green onion, garlic, whole chiles, and orange zest. Cook and stir a minute or two until the garlic has turned golden and the chiles brighten. Add 1/2 cup sugar, the ginger, chicken broth, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, and peanut oil; bring to a boil and cook for 3 minutes.
  6. Dissolve 2 teaspoons of cornstarch into the water, and stir into the boiling sauce. Return to a boil and cook until the sauce thickens and is no longer cloudy from the cornstarch, about 1 minute. Stir the chicken into the boiling sauce. Reduce heat to low and cook for a few minutes until the chicken absorbs some of the sauce.
Calories: 633

 

Sag Harbor 8th Annual HarborFrost 2018 …. Get Your Freeze On!
The Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce hosted The 8th Annual HARBORFROST on February 24TH 2018 in Sag Harbor, New York. It was a beautiful day in the harbor, not as icy cold as it had been in previous years. It was a perfect day for many brave people to take a dip in the frosty water.

A benefit for the Sag Harbor Ambulance Corp. Rich Daly who holds the record for the fastest ice carver in Guinness Records was present entertaining the crowd with his incredible artistry of ice sculptures.

Photo and video credit: Kurt Leggard, Photography by Kurt
https://www.smugmug.com/gallery/n-b584PJ/i-wnDB48d

Home Energy Assistance Program is back for 2017-18
HEAP is a federally funded program that assists low-income New Yorkers with the cost of heating their homes. HEAP also offers an emergency benefit for households in a heat or heat related energy emergency. Nearly 1.5 Million Households Received Assistance Last Winter
Households that need help paying their heating bills are able to apply for assistance from the Home Energy Assistance Program. The program provides financial assistance to help low-income and elderly New Yorkers keep their homes warm in the winter months and cool in the summer months.
heapgrid“The Home Energy Assistance Program is vital to helping struggling households afford the costs of heating their homes during the cold New York winters,” Governor Cuomo said. “It provides some much-needed relief, especially for low-income working families, as well as senior citizens on a fixed income. I encourage anyone in need of this assistance to apply before the coldest weather sets in.”

The Home Energy Assistance Program is funded by the federal government and is overseen by the New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance. Eligible households can receive a one-time benefit depending upon income, household size and heating source. For the 2017-18 season, a household of four can earn up to $53,484, or $4,457 a month, and still qualify for assistance.

Regular Benefit
Regular benefit component assists households that pay a high proportion of household income for energy.

Emergency Benefit
The Emergency benefit component assists qualifying low-income New Yorkers who are facing a heat or heat related energy emergency and do not have resources above the established limits. If you have an emergency, contact your local department of social services office.

Heating Equipment Repair or Replacement
The Heating Equipment Repair and Replacement benefit component help eligible low-income homeowners repair or replace primary heating equipment necessary to keep the home’s primary heating source functional.

Cooling Assistance
The Cooling Assistance component provides for cooling assistance services to HEAP eligible households that include an individual with a documented medical condition that is exacerbated by heat. Because the amount of funding is very limited, cooling assistance services will be provided on a first come, first served basis.

Income Guidelines
HEAP Gross Monthly Income Guidelines

Questions regarding the HEAP program should be directed to your local department of social services office or the OTDA Hotline at 1-800-342-3009.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Young women CAN and DO get breast cancer. It is estimated that more than 250,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 40 or younger are living in the U.S. today. While breast cancer in young women accounts for a small percentage of all breast cancer cases, the impact of the disease is significant.

Studies show that Advance Breast Cancer is becoming more common in younger women…New research finds almost a tripling of advanced or metastatic breast cancer among women ages 25 to 39 between 1976 and 2009. -Women with no history of breast cancer will not get their 1st Mammogram until age 40…Should these young women be encouraged to get mammograms earlier than 40 even if there is no family history of breast cancer?

The results are potentially worrisome because young women’s tumors tend to be more aggressive than older women’s, and they’re much less likely to get routine screening for the disease. In the United States, the incidence of breast cancer with distant involvement at diagnosis increased in W25-39 year-old women 1976- 2009. No other age group or extent-of-disease subgroup of the same age range had a similar increase. For 25- to 39-year-olds, there was an increased incidence in distant disease among all races and ethnicities evaluated, especially non-Hispanic white and African American, and this occurred in both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. Incidence for women with estrogen receptor–positive subtypes increased more than for women with estrogen receptor–negative subtypes.