Young Women Can and Do Get Breast Cancer

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Young women CAN and DO get breast cancer. It is estimated that more than 250,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 40 or younger are living in the U.S. today. While breast cancer in young women accounts for a small percentage of all breast cancer cases, the impact of the disease is significant.

Studies show that Advance Breast Cancer is becoming more common in younger women…New research finds almost a tripling of advanced or metastatic breast cancer among women ages 25 to 39 between 1976 and 2009. -Women with no history of breast cancer will not get their 1st Mammogram until age 40…Should these young women be encouraged to get mammograms earlier than 40 even if there is no family history of breast cancer?

The results are potentially worrisome because young women’s tumors tend to be more aggressive than older women’s, and they’re much less likely to get routine screening for the disease. In the United States, the incidence of breast cancer with distant involvement at diagnosis increased in W25-39 year-old women 1976- 2009. No other age group or extent-of-disease subgroup of the same age range had a similar increase. For 25- to 39-year-olds, there was an increased incidence in distant disease among all races and ethnicities evaluated, especially non-Hispanic white and African American, and this occurred in both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. Incidence for women with estrogen receptor–positive subtypes increased more than for women with estrogen receptor–negative subtypes.

October is National Breast Cancer Month

October is “National breast cancer awareness month” This is a cause that is near and dear to my heart because 20 years ago my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent both chemo-therapy and radiation…Praise God, she is cancer free and it has been 20 years…. I thought it was very important to discuss breast cancer, knowing the facts, the risks and the signs.

According to “” In 2015, there will be an estimated 1,658,370 new cancer cases diagnosed and 589,430 cancer deaths in the US. Wow these are staggering numbers and of particular concern to me since I am a high risk woman given that my mother did have breast cancer. When my mother was going through breast cancer and had to have  Chemo and surgery she was so sick and she lost her hair…I was so scared about getting the disease because all I could think about was loosing my hair and my breast, how superficial I was. I defined my beauty to my hair and breast like many other women. Seeing how strong my mother was and how beautiful she looked bald, I realized I could not allow my breast and hair to define who I am as a person. Don’t get me wrong I like my hair and I complain about bad hair days just like 95% of the total female population but I don’t stress about it. No need to stress on things you can purchase…if you loose your hair, you can buy a wig…you loose your breast you can buy new ones…problem solved. Focussing on the disease is all that matters, that is why it is important to know the risk,  recognize the signs and to take action on prevention care.
Everyone is at risk for breast cancer.

  • Being a Woman
  • Overweight
  • Increased Age
  • a family history of breast cancer or a personal history of breast or ovarian cancer

There are some factors that can increase a person’s risk, but some people develop breast cancer when the risk factor are not present. I would like to also add that there are men that develop breast cancer  and younger women as well. Recognizing the signs are very important to early detection and being cured. Performing breast self exam will help you know your body and what is normal and not normal. If you notice a change, you should see your doctor immediately. Here are some possible warning signs:

  • Lumps, a hard knot or thickening in any part of the breast
  • Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening that does not go away
  • pulling in of the nipple or other parts of the breast
  • New Pain in one spot that does not go away

Hamptons MouthPiece Readers, early detection is key in diagnosing breast cancer. Many cases of breast cancer are found by monthly breast self exams…an annual mammogram is one of the single most effective methods of early detection. No one looks forward to having a very uncomfortable mammogram, especially women like myself who are well-endowed and you feel like your breast has just been smashed like a pancake. The sooner a problem is found, the more treatment options are available and the better chance you have of beating the disease and living a full healthy life. I hope this reaches someone and you decide to take action, your life is important so you must take care of yourself. If health insurance is an area of concern, there are many services that offer FREE mammograms, all you have to do is ask. I am grateful that I have not been diagnosed I continue to do monthly BSF and I have yearly mammograms, no one knows why and how many women get breast cancer but if I am meant to get I will have a better chance of survival because I do partake in preventive care. I need to be around to nag my husband ,drive my girls completely crazy and plan all of my friends birthday celebrations…until next time read Hamptons Mouthpiece….always keeping you in the know!!!! October is National Breast Cancer Month

American Cancer Society:
Cancer Facts & Figures 2015 Special Section: Breast Carcinoma In Situ
In 2015, there will be an estimated 60,290 new cases of breast carcinoma in situ diagnosed, 83% of which will be ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 12% lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). This year’s special section reviews breast carcinoma in situ, including incidence rates and trends, risk factors, prognostic characteristics, and treatment patterns. It is intended to inform anyone interested in learning more about breast carcinoma in situ, including policy makers, researchers, clinicians, cancer control advocates, patients, and caregivers.
visit for more information

For more detailed data click on link to see the Breast Cancer facts and Figures 2015-

Women’s Health Hamptons Gala kicks off Run 10 Feed 10

Women’s Health Hamptons Gala kicks off Run 10 Feed 10….Party under the Stars Gala to Benefit FEED FOUNDATION

Rosario Dawson
Rosario Dawson

As Many of you know the 2015 theme of Hamptons Mouthpiece is Journey to when I was invited to attend Women’s Health Magazine annual Hamptons event I was excited to attend. Unfortunately I was unable to partake in the earlier activities in Montauk on Saturday, August 1st, but I was able to attend the evening event Party under the Stars in Bridgehampton a benefit for a wonderful organization FEED Foundation. The FEED Foundation is the non-profit arm of FEED that supports programs and organizations that are effectively working to fight hunger and eliminate malnutrition. It has since grown to encompass hunger relief efforts both stateside and abroad, as well as provide aid during natural disasters and humanitarian crises worldwide. As of January 2015, FEED has provided over 87 million meals globally.

THE DAYTIME WELLNESS EVENT: Took place at the “Well-thy House” with Women’s Health and Domino Magazine–a co-branded event hosted at Women’s Health VP/Publisher Laura Frerer-Schmidt’s newly constructed Montauk home.The event featured top experts leading home and garden workshops, workouts, cooking demos and nutrition consultations. The lunch at the event was in support of Women’s Health’s partner, the FEED Foundation and the charity event series RUN10 FEED10. womens health-47
Joining Women’s Health and Domino at the Well-thy House included:
• Mandy Ingber, celebrity yoga instructor: Yoga class
• Heidi Powell, celebrity trainer and star of ABC’s Extreme Weightloss: Workout
• Jeff Dawson: Garden Manager at Golden Door; crating a backyard herb garden
• Greg Frey Jr.: Executive Chef at Golden Door; garden-to-table lunch and demo
• Keri Glassman, registered dietitian: The Cleanse
• GLAMSQUAD Hair & Makeup
• Owl’s Brew Tea mocktails and cocktails

womens health-31The annual “Party Under the Stars” event was held at the Bridgehampton Surf & Tennis club in the evening. Always a fun event,good energy,great drinks, beautiful location, great weather, amazing appetizers and fantastic music.

Taryn Manning
Taryn Manning
The star-studded event featured music by guest DJ Taryn Manning from the Netflix Series “Orange is the New Black” a live reggae band that was terrific a silent auction to benefit the FEED foundation, beach bonfire and cocktails & Hors d’Oeuvres by Robbins Wolffe.womens health-37
I spotted Rosario Dawson, Taryn Manning and Laura Prep from Orange is the New Black, Anne Burrell from Worst Cook in America, Ginger Zee from GMA, TV personality Andi Dorfman, Adrienne Bailon, Molly Sims,Tashiana Washington & Eric West.
Tashiana Washington & Eric West
Tashiana Washington & Eric West
Anne Burrell-Celebrity Chef
Anne Burrell-Celebrity Chef
Ginger Zee, GMA
Ginger Zee, GMA

Many people from NYC came out to the Hamptons for the day with transportation provided by Hampton Jitney courtesy of Women’s Health Magazine. This is one of my favorite Hamptons events because it is a mixture of real women, not your typical Hamptons event.womens health-53

womens health-49

 Lindsay Brown and Bryan Quinlan.
Lindsay Brown and Bryan Quinlan.

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For more information on how you can get involved with RUN10FEED10
womens health-57

Go Red for February..National Heart Awareness Month

Go Red for February..National Heart Awareness Month

February is National Heart Awareness month and the color is RED…What does that mean GO RED? Although Red is the color of Valentine’s Day it is the celebration on women who have battled Heart disease, it is the color for bringing awareness to Heart Disease the #1 Killer among Women in the Nation. It is a very important cause for me because my mother has heart disease and it was very scary and continue to be scary. Heart disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of disability in the United States. Nearly 600,000 Americans die of heart disease annually. This represents almost 25% of all deaths in the United States. To raise awareness of this disease, February has been recognized as “American Heart Month” since 1963.

go redThe U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) strongly recommends cholesterol screening for men aged 35 and older. For people who have a family history of early heart disease the USPSTF recommends cholesterol screening beginning at age 20 for both women and men. Health care providers can help patients evaluate their family histories to determine a screening approach that is best for them.

  • Heart Disease is the #1 Killer for women in the Nation.
  • 42 million women in the US have Heart disease
  • #1 Killer among African-American women
  • #1 killer among all Americans both men & women
  • 1 in 26 women die from Breast Cancer
  • 1 in 3 will die from heart disease

My mother’s life was saved twice once in 2005 and again in 2013 because she recognized the signs and went to see her doctor…What are some of the signs to recognize:

  1. Extreme Fatigue
  2. Shortness of Breath
  3. Light-headed
  4. Nausea
  5. Intense heart palpitations

If you are administering these symptoms seeks medical attention, better to be safe than sorry…This my friends is not just a disease that hits older white men. It can attack anyone at anytime at any age. There are some preventative actions you can do as well:

  1. Loose Weight
  2. Develop a Healthy Plan
  3. Exercise
  4. Snack through-out the day with healthy snacks
  5. drink plenty of Water
  6. Decrease sugar and Salt intake (Star Jones recommends Stevia, a natural sugar substitute)
  7. organize a 30 minute walk a day…Make it fun walk with friends

Take Control of your life Hamptons MouthPiece Readers….YOU CAN DO IT! 

Go Red for February..National Heart Awareness Month..for more information visit American Heart Association,

Easy ways to help fight heart disease…join National Wear Red Day! It’s easy. On Friday, February 7th, wear red and collect $5 donations from your friends/colleagues! They get a red dress pin and you can all feel good about supporting the fight against heart disease & stroke! I can sign you up to be your organization’s coordinator. Just email my friend

795,000 Americans face stroke each year, and the number of Americans living with stroke is expected to grow to 3.4 million by 2030. Despite many medical advances, there is still so much work to be done. That’s why we need Congress to make stroke research funding a priority this year. Our lives truly depend on it.

American Heart Association Quick & Easy Cookbook, 2nd Edition: More Than 200 Healthy Recipes You Can Make in Minutes

Hamptons Wellness: 34 Menopause Symptoms

Hamptons Wellness: 34 Menopause Symptoms
I am slowly approaching the next phase of my life and in my quest to understand what is going on with me, I found an article called 34 Menopause Symptoms and I knew I needed to share this with all of you traveling this journey with me. Let me assure you, you are not loosing your mind……we are just a MESS and God help the people who have to live with us.

Many women experience some physical and emotional symptoms during menopause, caused by hormonal imbalance. Some women begin to experience menopause symptoms around her mid-40’s as her body’s reproductive capability comes to the end. I find it fascinating that women bleed for 5 days every month except those month you are pregnant for nearly 40 years.

34 Menopause Symptoms
1. Hot Flashes
Hot flashes: a sudden feeling of warmth spreading all over the face and upper bodyHot flashes, also known as hot flushes, are a sudden, transient sensation of warmth or heat that spreads over the body, creating a flushing, or redness, that is particularly noticeable on the face and upper body. The experience of hot flashes can range between delicate flushes and a sensation of engulfing flames.

2. Night Sweats
Night sweats are a common symptom of menopause that occurs during sleepNight sweats are classified as severe hot flashes that occur during sleep accompanied by intense bouts of sweating. Also known as “sleep hyperhidrosis”, night sweats aren’t actually a sleep disorder, but a common perspiration disorder that occurs during sleep in menopausal women. These episodes of nighttime sweating can range in severity from mild to intense, and can be caused by hormonal imbalance combined with environmental factors, such as an excessively warm sleeping environment.

3. Irregular Periods
Irregular periods are most common in the mid 40s, as menopause approachesMost women will experience absent, short, or irregular periods at some point in their lives. A wide range of conditions can cause irregular periods, though during perimenopause the most common cause is hormonal imbalance. Periods may come earlier or later than before; bleeding may be lighter or heavier than usual; and periods may be brief or go on for what feels like an eternity. Skipping periods and “spotting” – bleeding between periods – are also common symptoms of hormonal imbalance.

4. Loss of Libido
A hormonal imbalance or prescription drug can lower sex driveEveryone experiences peaks and valleys in sexual desire, an ebb and flow in libido that could be caused by any of a variety of factors. However, for women going through menopause, this sudden drop in desire for sexual activity or intimacy can be troubling. In menopausal women, the main cause of low sex drive is hormonal imbalance, predominantly androgen deficiency. Loss of libido can also be caused by other menopause symptoms themselves, such as vaginal dryness or depression, or by prescription drugs, including medication prescribed to treat menopause symptoms.

5. Vaginal Dryness
Vaginal dryness is the lost of moisture inside the vagina Vaginal dryness occurs when the usually moist and soft feeling of the lining of the vagina disappears, bringing about symptoms such as itchiness and irritation. When estrogen levels drop during perimenopause, the vaginal tissue becomes drier, thinner, and less elastic. Lack of lubrication leads to sex becoming uncomfortable, and the vagina is frequently itchy, easily irritated, and more prone to infections.

6. Mood Swings
Chronic, intense mood swings may be a psychological disorderMenopausal mood swings are surprisingly common, but can be hard to cope with. A woman experiencing mood swings may feel like she is on a rollercoaster of emotions: one minute she’s up, the next minute she’s down. Mood swings can be sudden and intense, although the experience of them may differ from woman to woman.

7. Fatigue
Fatigue is a persistent feeling of weakness, tiredness, and lowered energy levelFatigue, one of the most common menopause symptoms, is defined as an ongoing and persistent feeling of weakness, tiredness, and lowered energy levels, rather than just sleepiness or drowsiness. Other characteristics of fatigue may include apathy, irritability, and decreased attention span. Crashing fatigue is a phenomenon which comes on suddenly, leaving a woman devoid of energy and unable to continue her activity.

8. Hair Loss or Thinning
Hair loss can be sudden or gradual shedding or thinning of hair on your headHair loss, one of the most physically noticeable menopause symptoms, is caused by estrogen deficiency, because hair follicles need estrogen to sustain hair growth. Hair loss may be sudden or gradual, or manifest as thinning hair on the head or other parts of the body, including the pubic area. Hair may also become drier and more brittle, and may fall out more while brushing or in the shower.

9. Sleep Disorders
During menopause, you may have problems with insomniaWaking many times during the night, tossing and turning, and insomnia, are all sleep disorders connected with menopause. Women going through menopause may find that their sleep is less restful and that getting to sleep becomes increasingly difficult. Research indicates that women begin to experience restless sleep as many as five to seven years before entering menopause.

10. Difficulty Concentrating
Not getting enough sleep or having sleep disruptions can contribute to concentration problemsIn the lead-up to menopause, many women are concerned to find they have trouble remembering things, experience mental blocks, or have difficulty concentrating. This can be confusing or worrying for women, and can have a big impact on all aspects of daily life. The main reason why these symptoms occur during menopause is hormonal imbalance, specifically estrogen deficiency. However, not getting enough sleep or sleep disruptions can also contribute to memory problems and cause difficulty concentrating, as well as the nagging pain of other physiological menopause symptoms.

11.Memory Lapses
Memory lapses are a normal symptom of menopause Women approaching menopause often complain of memory loss, memory lapses, and an inability to concentrate. Misplaced car keys, skipped appointments, forgotten birthdays, and missed trains of thought might seem like trivial occurrences, but these can be extremely distressing for women who have never missed a beat before. However, these memory lapses are a normal symptom of menopause, associated with low levels of estrogen and with high stress levels.

12. Dizziness
Dizziness is a temporary feeling of spinning and/or unsteadiness Dizziness is a transient spinning sensation, which may be accompanied by a feeling of lightheadedness or unsteadiness, as well as the inability to maintain balance upon standing or while walking. Episodes can last for as little as a few seconds, but can leave a woman feeling out of sorts for an extended period of time, or may even lead to falls, which can impact her daily home and work life.

13. Weight Gain
Weight gain is another sign of changing hormones Weight gain, specifically a thickening around the waist, is another sign of changing hormones levels during menopause. While some sources claim that menopause has nothing to do with weight gain, hormonal changes during menopause actually influence weight gain and redistribution of fat. For example, fewer circulating estrogen hormones lead the body to retain more fat cells as an alternative source of components of estrogen.

14. Incontinence
Incontinence is the involuntary excretion of urineIncontinence in menopausal women can be divided into three types. Stress incontinence is the accidental release of urine while laughing, coughing, sneezing, or due to over-exertion. This usually happens when the internal muscles fail to work effectively, because of age, surgery, or childbirth. With urge incontinence, the bladder develops a “mind of its own,” contracting and emptying whenever full despite an individual’s conscious efforts to resist. Overflow incontinence is the absence of the sensation of a full bladder, whereby accidental urination occurs because the individual doesn’t realize the bladder is full.

15. Bloating
Lactose intolerance causes gassiness, bloating, and discomfort after eating dairy foods Bloating occurs in most women throughout their lives, due to digestive issues or as a part of PMS. This symptom is characterized by a swollen belly, a feeling of tightness, and discomfort or pain in the stomach area. Typically, this arises from intestinal gas caused by poor food transit; this is due to low levels of bile, which is caused by estrogen deficiency. One other cause of bloating could be lactose intolerance, or the body’s rejection of dairy foods. As people age, they produce less lactase – the enzyme needed to digest lactose.

16. Allergies
Allergic reactions due to hormone imbalance are experienced by womenHormones and the immune system are inextricably linked, so hormonal changes during menopause can lead to an increase in allergies among menopausal women. Many women experience increased sensitivity to allergies, while others may suddenly become allergic to something that never bothered them before. This is particularly the case with hay fever, asthma, and dermatitis.

17. Brittle Nails
Brittle nails may be caused by different underlying conditions Nail appearance can tell a lot about a person’s general health and habits. There are a variety of nail changes that occur during menopause that could indicate an underlying problem, but the most common is brittle nails, or nails that are softer, or that crack, split, or break horizontally across the top of the nail. This can indicate a nutritional deficiency; however, in menopausal women brittle nails are usually due to hormonal imbalance. Low estrogen levels cause dehydration in the body, leading to dryness of the skin, hair, and nails.

18. Changes in Body Odor
Odor is produced by bacteria that grow on the skinChanges in body odor can make the menopausal women experiencing them very self-conscious. Menopausal hormonal changes cause an increase in sweat production, in response to physical menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, or psychological symptoms such as anxiety and panic disorder. This increase in sweat production can lead to increased body odor, even while maintaining a good personal hygiene regimen.

19. Irregular Heartbeat
A pounding heart is a common complaint associated with perimenopause Irregular heartbeat is one of the more concerning menopause symptoms. Bouts of pounding, rapid heartbeat scare many women because of their sudden onset and the difficulty in calming them. One of the causes of these symptoms during menopause is hormonal imbalance. Estrogen deficiency can over-stimulate the nervous and circulatory systems, causing irregular heartbeat and palpitations, as well as certain arrhythmias.

20. Depression
Severity and duration are factors in distinguishing ordinary sadness from a depressive disorderFeelings of sadness can be normal, appropriate, and even necessary during life’s setbacks or losses. Feeling blue or unhappy for short periods of time without reason or warning is also normal and ordinary. But if such feelings persist or impair daily life, it could signal a depressive disorder. The severity and duration of the sad feelings, as well as the presence of other symptoms, are factors that distinguish ordinary sadness from a depressive disorder. Other symptoms of depression include loss of interest in usual activities, sleep and eating disorders, and withdrawal from family and friends.

21. Anxiety
Panic attacks include agitation, palpitations and shortness of breath Anxiety is a vague or intense feeling caused by physical or psychological conditions, typified by feelings of agitation and loss of emotional control. Anxiety or feelings of anxiousness are also associated with panic attacks, and can manifest as physical symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, and palpitations. Anxiety during menopause is caused by the sudden drop in estrogen levels circulating in the body, which reduce the production of neurotransmitters responsible for mood regulation, such as serotonin and dopamine.

22. Irritability
Irritability involves mood swings and loss of interest in usual activitiesIrritability is a pervading “bad mood” characterized by feelings of stress, reduced patience and tolerance, and lashing out in anger or frustration over matters that may seem trivial to others. Irritability during menopause is most often caused by hormonal changes, whereby low levels of circulating estrogen have an adverse effect on the neurotransmitters in the brain that are responsible for regulating mood.

23. Panic Disorder
Panic attacks usually strike suddenly. Panic disorder consists of significant and debilitating emotional episodes characterized by sudden and overwhelming fear and anxiety. These feelings can be intense, and caused by physical or psychological conditions. An episode of panic disorder may entail rapid heartbeat, feeling of dread, shallow breathing, nervousness, and feelings of extreme terror. These panic “attacks” can range in frequency from a single episode to regular occurrences.

24. Breast Pain
Breast tenderness or pain is often associated with the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause. Typically, breast pain is characterized as a generalized discomfort or pain associated with touching or applying pressure to the breasts. Breast pain, soreness, or breast tenderness in one or both breasts is symptomatic of hormonal changes, and as such often precedes or accompanies menstrual periods, and can also occur during pregnancy, post-partum, and menopause. The specific imbalance of hormones that causes breast pain is unique to each individual woman, so breast pain might occur at different times or at different intensities in individual women.

25. Headaches
Dropping estrogen levels may cause more frequent and intense headachesHeadaches can be caused by a variety of factors such as muscle tension, drinking too much alcohol, or as a side effect of common illnesses such as the flu. However, headaches are also linked with the effects of hormonal imbalance, and therefore with the various stages of reproductive life.

26. Joint Pain
Joint pain can be caused by hormonal fluctuations instead of traumaJoint pain is one of the most common symptoms of menopause. It is thought that more than half of all postmenopausal women experience varying degrees of joint pain. Joint pain is an unexplained soreness in muscles and joints, which is unrelated to trauma or exercise, but may be related to the effects of fluctuating hormone levels on the immune system. Estrogen helps prevent inflammation in the joints, so low levels of estrogen during menopause can lead to increased instances of inflammation, and therefore increased joint pain.

27. Burning Tongue
Burning mouth syndrome involves a burning pain without signs of irritationBurning mouth syndrome is a complex, vexing condition in which a burning pain occurs on the tongue or lips, or throughout the whole mouth, without visible signs of irritation, but accompanied with other symptoms such as bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth. Burning tongue affects up to 5% of U.S. adults, women seven times more than men. It generally occurs after age 60, but it may occur in younger people as well.

28. Electric Shock Sensation
Electric shocks involve a tingle between skin and muscle This symptom presents a peculiar “electric” sensation, like the feeling of a rubber band snapping in the layer of tissue between skin and muscle, or, when it appears as a precursor to a hot flash, it is often felt across the head. Electric shocks usually only occur for a brief moment, but it can still be quite an unpleasant sensation. The cause of electric shock sensation in menopause is thought to be related to the effect of fluctuating estrogen levels on the cardiovascular and nervous systems.

29. Digestive Problems
Digestive problems involve many changes in gastrointestinal function Digestive problems are defined as changes in gastrointestinal function, with symptoms such as excessive gas production, gastrointestinal cramping, and nausea. There are a couple of reasons why menopausal women might be experiencing more digestive problems than previously: hormonal imbalance disrupts the natural transit of food in the gut, and stress has an adverse effect on the normal functioning of hormones.

30. Gum Problems
The most common gum problem is known as gingivitis and involves swollen gums Gum problems are common among menopausal women; although these could be due to poor dental hygiene, they are also caused by menopausal hormonal changes, mainly estrogen deficiency. The most common of the gum problems experienced in menopause is gingivitis, or inflammation and bleeding of the gums. Left untreated, gum problems can lead to tooth loss, infections, and heart disease, so it is important to seek treatment for gum problems in menopause.

31. Muscle Tension
Muscle tension leads to an increase of aches and pains throughout the body.Muscle tension is when muscles, especially the ones in the neck, shoulders, and back, feel tight or strained, or when there is a general increase in aches, pains, soreness, and stiffness throughout the body. Muscle tension is a common symptom of menopause, because low estrogen levels lead to a rise in cortisol, known primarily as the stress hormone. Continued high levels of cortisol cause the muscles in the body to tighten and become fatigued.

32. Itchy, Crawly Skin
Loss of collagen causes the skin to become dry and less youthful looking When estrogen levels drop during perimenopause, collagen production also slows down. Collagen is responsible for keeping skin toned, fresh-looking, and resilient. So when the body starts running low on collagen, it shows in the skin, as the skin gets thinner, drier, flakier, and less youthful-looking. Skin dryness leads to pruritus, or itchy skin, a frustrating symptom that can disrupt both women’s sleeping and waking lives.

33. Tingling Extremities
Tingling on only one side of the body requires immediate medical attentionTingling extremities is where menopausal women experience the feeling of “creepy-crawlies” walking all over their skin, a burning sensation like an insect sting, or super-sensitivity in their hands, arms, legs, and feet. In most people, tingling is harmless, usually occurring due to a pinched nerve or compressed artery, which reduces blood flow through the extremity causing it to “fall asleep”. However, in menopausal women, tingling extremities is likely caused by the effect that low estrogen levels have on the central nervous system.

34. Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis: a degenerative thinning of the bone that decreases its mass and densityOsteoporosis is a degenerative bone disorder, characterized by thinning and weakening of the bone and a general decrease in bone mass and density. Menopause negatively affects bone growth. Normally, bones go through a process whereby old bone is replaced with new bone cells, but the body’s ability to handle this process changes with age. By around age 35 there is less bone growth than there is bone removal.

for More detailed information on menopausal symptoms