October is National Breast Cancer Month

UPDATE FROM 2012 ORIGINAL…
October is “National breast cancer awareness month” This is a cause that is near and dear to my heart because 20 years ago my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent both chemo-therapy and radiation…Praise God, she is cancer free and it has been 20 years…. I thought it was very important to discuss breast cancer, knowing the facts, the risks and the signs.

According to “Cancer.org” In 2015, there will be an estimated 1,658,370 new cancer cases diagnosed and 589,430 cancer deaths in the US. Wow these are staggering numbers and of particular concern to me since I am a high risk woman given that my mother did have breast cancer. When my mother was going through breast cancer and had to have  Chemo and surgery she was so sick and she lost her hair…I was so scared about getting the disease because all I could think about was loosing my hair and my breast, how superficial I was. I defined my beauty to my hair and breast like many other women. Seeing how strong my mother was and how beautiful she looked bald, I realized I could not allow my breast and hair to define who I am as a person. Don’t get me wrong I like my hair and I complain about bad hair days just like 95% of the total female population but I don’t stress about it. No need to stress on things you can purchase…if you loose your hair, you can buy a wig…you loose your breast you can buy new ones…problem solved. Focussing on the disease is all that matters, that is why it is important to know the risk,  recognize the signs and to take action on prevention care.
Everyone is at risk for breast cancer.

  • Being a Woman
  • Overweight
  • Increased Age
  • a family history of breast cancer or a personal history of breast or ovarian cancer

There are some factors that can increase a person’s risk, but some people develop breast cancer when the risk factor are not present. I would like to also add that there are men that develop breast cancer  and younger women as well. Recognizing the signs are very important to early detection and being cured. Performing breast self exam will help you know your body and what is normal and not normal. If you notice a change, you should see your doctor immediately. Here are some possible warning signs:

  • Lumps, a hard knot or thickening in any part of the breast
  • Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening that does not go away
  • pulling in of the nipple or other parts of the breast
  • New Pain in one spot that does not go away

Hamptons MouthPiece Readers, early detection is key in diagnosing breast cancer. Many cases of breast cancer are found by monthly breast self exams…an annual mammogram is one of the single most effective methods of early detection. No one looks forward to having a very uncomfortable mammogram, especially women like myself who are well-endowed and you feel like your breast has just been smashed like a pancake. The sooner a problem is found, the more treatment options are available and the better chance you have of beating the disease and living a full healthy life. I hope this reaches someone and you decide to take action, your life is important so you must take care of yourself. If health insurance is an area of concern, there are many services that offer FREE mammograms, all you have to do is ask. I am grateful that I have not been diagnosed I continue to do monthly BSF and I have yearly mammograms, no one knows why and how many women get breast cancer but if I am meant to get I will have a better chance of survival because I do partake in preventive care. I need to be around to nag my husband ,drive my girls completely crazy and plan all of my friends birthday celebrations…until next time read Hamptons Mouthpiece….always keeping you in the know!!!! October is National Breast Cancer Month

American Cancer Society:
Cancer Facts & Figures 2015 Special Section: Breast Carcinoma In Situ
In 2015, there will be an estimated 60,290 new cases of breast carcinoma in situ diagnosed, 83% of which will be ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 12% lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). This year’s special section reviews breast carcinoma in situ, including incidence rates and trends, risk factors, prognostic characteristics, and treatment patterns. It is intended to inform anyone interested in learning more about breast carcinoma in situ, including policy makers, researchers, clinicians, cancer control advocates, patients, and caregivers.
visit Cancer.org for more information

For more detailed data click on link to see the Breast Cancer facts and Figures 2015-

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